IMAGES AND IMPRESSIONS

 

Autumn

 

Context:

The poem depicts the poet’s impression about a charming but cold autumn night. The moon looked red like a farmer’s red face and the stars appeared white like the white faces of town children.

Explanation:           

These lines are known as imagist poetry. One night the poet went out for a walk. He saw the red moon that looked like a red-faced farmer leaning over the hedge.  He did not stop to enjoy the beauty of the moon. However, he showed his pleasure by nodding his head. He saw some stars surrounding the moon. The stars were not so bright and red as the moon was. They were dim and white like the white faces of town children. They were wistful because they could not fulfill their desire of being as red as the moon was.

The poet has used many poetic devices like images, smilies, and metaphors. Ruddy moon like the red-faced farmer and stars like town children with white faces are similies. Touch of cold, moon leaning over a hedge and wistful stars are metaphors. Informal and conversational language has been used.

 

Fog

Context:

The poem expresses the poet’s impressions about the fog. He compares it to a cat and says that it comes quietly like a cat, spreads everywhere and then melts

Explanation:

The poet personifies fog and tells us how fog comes like a cat stealthily and spreads all over the city. It then sits on its haunches (back legs) and watches the things around it. It looks over the harbor and city and moves on to go somewhere else. The image of the cat’s coming, sitting, looking, and then moving on has been drawn so masterly and beautiful that the whole foggy scene comes into the reader’s eyes.

 

Metro: Paris

Context:

In this poem the poet compares the faces of the passengers of the metro, the underground Paris train, to the petals of the wet and black branch of a tree.

Explanation:

The poet narrates his experience at the underground railway station of Paris. He gets out of the train and sees a crowd of people there. These are those people who travel daily by train to reach their destinations or workplaces there is no glow of pleasure on their faces. The poet calls them ghostly appearing figures and mere petals that are scattered on the wet black branch of the tree. This is an imagist poem. The poem contains only fourteen words, further exemplifying Imagism’s precise economy of language. It is also worth noting that the number of words in the poem (fourteen) is the same as the number of lines in a sonnet.

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